7 Bad Habits of Successful Business People

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7 Bad Habits of Successful Business People

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Just because you’re successful, doesn’t mean you are perfect. In fact, we’re all walking around with some sort of self-doubt or imperfection. We all have a bad habit or two we need to break.

If you want to be successful, you need to be constantly reaching forward toward improvement. The sad fact is that most people who attempt to startup a business fail precisely because they fail to recognize their flaws.

This is why today we’re going to illuminate some flaws even the most successful business people fall prey to. So let’s dig in and make some corrections.

1. Failing to Delegate

It’s easy to take on everything on your own shoulders. Especially if you created your business all by yourself and now you’re taking on employees, it’s difficult to let go of the reigns.

Just because you’re successful, doesn’t mean you are perfect. In fact, we’re all walking around with some sort of self-doubt or imperfection. We all have a bad habit or two we need to break.

If you want to be successful, you need to be constantly reaching forward toward improvement. The sad fact is that most people who attempt to start up a business fail precisely because they fail to recognize their flaws.

This is why today I’m going to illuminate some flaws even the most successful business people fall prey to. So let’s dig in and make some corrections.

1. Failing to Delegate

It’s easy to take on everything on your own shoulders. Especially if you created your business all by yourself and now you’re taking on employees, it’s difficult to let go of the reigns.

There’s a reason entrepreneurs succeed. They can uniquely envision every detail before they hit the execute key. But this can be a curse as well as a blessing.

You’ve learned to trust only yourself and no one else. That means you leave your teammates with no work and you eventually burn out.

Instead, learn to trust your team. They are all experts in something or why did you hire them?

Bring your team together and make sure they know what they’re doing and then assign them what you might not enjoy doing as much.

2. Micromanaging

Another symptom most new entrepreneurs exhibit is micromanaging. This might seem the same as a failure to delegate, but it’s still possible to micromanage even after delegating assignments.

This is part of trusting your employees. If you’re constantly telling them how to do their job, you’ll irritate the hell out of them first of all and second of all, they’ll get no work done. This method of management breeds resentment.

Instead of breeding resentment, learn to check in maybe once a day or once a week depending on the project. Checking in too often is like checking in on your unmetered dedicated servers every day instead of every few weeks. You are narrowing your data set by checking too often and you’re not getting an accurate picture of production and numbers.

3. Failing to Take Risks

One of the basic tenants of entrepreneurialism is risk-taking. It’s like being an ultrarunner and not running ultramarathons cause you might get injured and have to start over. It’s just stupid.

Now, there are reasons not to take risk. Using the ultramarathon example, you wouldn’t continue through the night if you were injured and unprepared for the cold. If you got hypothermic, you could veer off the trail, get lost, and die.

You must continually evaluate how much risk you’re willing to take on. This means taking stock of your assets and paying attention to every detail. But you must not hesitate to experiment with new angles.

Sure, learn from the tried and true, but don’t be afraid to pivot when you need to. What happens if you fail? You learn from your mistakes and start over.

4. Promising the Universe

When you can only promise the world, don’t promise the universe.

More people than you think struggle with the word “no.” You want your clients to be happy, but if you can’t deliver, what good was your word?

What happens when you over-promise to your clients? You end up overworking your team and ultimately selling the client short.

Instead of being proud and saying yes to everything the client wants, recognize your company’s limitations and communicate those limitations tactfully to the client.

5. Being Reactive

Foresight isn’t everyone’s strong suit. I am personally a pantser when it comes to writing my fiction. This doesn’t apply well to the rest of life.

Even if you can’t predict everything that might come your way in a business, you can reasonably prepare for the future. If you’re prepared, you have time to be proactive and tackle surprises before they become a problem.

6. Forgetting to Take Care of Yourself

Workaholics, they’re everywhere ruining their lives and pretending they’re successful. Workaholics are successful if you only count their monetary value. But they’re useless anywhere but the office.

And guess what? You’ll eventually burn out! That’s right. If you don’t take care of yourself, you’ll eventually harm yourself and even your business.

Ancient cultures adopted rest days for a reason. The human mind and the human body cannot survive without rest. Our body must sleep to repair the damage our environment inflicts. The same can be said about our minds.

You’re experiencing a monumental amount of stress when you’re running a startup. You’re likely going at least 60 hours a week. This kind of stress will eventually build up in your system your body will eventually say enough is enough.

7. Thinking It’s All About Money

Someone recently told me that $650,000 a month wasn’t enough for him right after telling me that business is all about helping people. I don’t think he realized how contradictory he was being. While making money will help you enjoy a certain level of comfort in this life, if you make it your sole venture, you will never be happy.

If your work isn’t actually meaningful, you’ll again burn out. Money is meaningless if it’s not helping someone. It’s just a placeholder for meaningless wealth.

Instead, focus on two things: helping your clients the best you can and helping your team achieve their own goals. If you do this, not only will you make money, but you’ll find meaning in life.


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